FLOOD VIDEO: Journalist confirms LA Metro Station on Wilshire or Vermont Beverly flooding from storm is FAKE NEWS


FLOOD VIDEO: Journalist confirms LA Metro Station on Wilshire or Vermont Beverly flooding from storm is FAKE NEWS
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Information reaching Kossyderrickent has it that Journalist confirms LA Metro Station on Wilshire or Vermont Beverly flooding from storm is FAKE NEWS.


Taking to social media, American journalist, Brian confirmed:
“Note that the video below that has been circulating on social media is not from tropical storm Hilary. It’s actually the Earthquake experience of the Universal Studios Hollywood tour.

“This video making rounds on social media purportedly of Hurricane Hilary is not authentic, as it is in Universal Studios, it’s a ride automated to appear like a disaster, not Vermont Beverly Metro Station in Los Angeles.” 

A recent social media frenzy sparked by a Twitter user known as “Mexican Rug Dealer” (@DealinRugs) has led to a chain of humorous events centered around an alleged flooding incident at the Wilshire/Vermont Los Angeles Metro Station. Despite the claims, it’s important to clarify that the station is not experiencing any flooding related to the ongoing storm.

The catalyst for this amusing misunderstanding was a tweet by @DealinRugs, which initially announced, “The LA Metro Station on Wilshire/Vermont is flooding from the storm.” This proclamation swiftly caught the attention of Twitter users, sparking a whirlwind of reactions.

The USGS reported there were at least four aftershocks of magnitude-3.0 or greater. The earthquake was centered about four miles southeast of Ojai, about 80 miles northwest of Los Angeles.

Shaking was reported in Malibu, Porter Ranch, parts of Los Angeles, Manhattan Beach and other locations.. 

As Hurricane Hilary barreled toward California on Saturday, Los Angeles residents accustomed to earthquakes and wildfires focused on a whole new genre of natural disaster preparation: a tropical storm.

Some called Gulf Coast and East Coast relatives for advice. Others relied on earthquake tips. They jammed Costco warehouses and grocery stores, waited in long lines for gas, and stocked up on batteries and granola bars.

Anything capable of making light — candles, flashlights and batteries, lanterns and camping fuel, even old-fashioned oil lamps — were sold out by Saturday afternoon at many neighborhood hardware stores and retail warehouses.

The empty shelves in the flashlight section of a Woodward’s ACE Hardware store in Santa Ana reminded store manager Cindy Finch of the hordes of panicked customers who stockpiled groceries and hand sanitizer during the pandemic.

WATCH VIDEO

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