Monday, March 4, 2024
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Jinger Duggar breaks dad Jim Bob's rules as she rocks tight pants on a church outing with her husband Jeremy and kids in Los Angeles

 Jinger Duggar Vuolo has made a defiant stand by breaking her dad Jim Bob’s rules by rocking tight pants on a recent church outing just weeks after admitting that she may have had religious obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) as a child.

  The 29-year-old reality TV star – who found fame on 19 Kids And Counting, and Counting On -was seen wearing trousers while heading to a religious service with her husband Jeremy and their children in Los Angeles on Monday.

The writer donned tight light brown trousers with a flair at the end which are strictly against her family’s dress code growing up which was enforced by the Institute Of Basic Life Principles.

Those guidelines were enforced for women to dress modestly by wearing skirts which go past their knees and prohibited any pants wearing.

Jinger and sisters Jill, Jana, and Jessa had previously opened up about their parents’ – Jim Bob and Michelle Duggar – reasoning for not allowing girls in the family to wear pants.

Taking a stand: Jinger Duggar Vuolo has made a defiant stand by breaking her dad Jim Bob’s rules by rocking tight pants on a recent church outing

They wrote in the 2014 book Growing Up Duggar: ‘We do not dress modestly because we are ashamed of the body God has given us; quite the contrary.

‘We realize that our body is a special gift from God and that He intends for it to be shared only with our future husband.’

On her most recent outing Jinger teamed the controversial bottoms with an oversized black knit sweater and white heeled leather booties.

Her blonde locks were pulled back as she showcased her natural looks with minimal make-up.

She looked happy to be on the family outing with her 36-year-old former American soccer star husband Jeremy and their two daughters: five-year-old Felicity Nicole and Evangeline Jo who will turn three next month.

Her rebellious act comes at an interesting time as back in August she admitted she may had religious obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) as a child after breaking away from her family’s ultra-strict religious beliefs.

At the time she appeared on Big Bang Theory alum Mayim Bailik’s Breakdown podcast.

While discussing her time living with her family, who followed the teachings of the Institute In Basic Life Principles (IBLP), Mayim mentioned that Jinger may have a mental health disorder called religious OCD, also known as scrupulosity.

Hmm: The 29-year-old reality TV star - who found fame on 19 Kids And Counting, and Counting On -was seen wearing trousers while heading to a religious service with her husband Jeremy and their children in Los Angeles on Monday

Hmm: The 29-year-old reality TV star – who found fame on 19 Kids And Counting, and Counting On -was seen wearing trousers while heading to a religious service with her husband Jeremy and their children in Los Angeles on Monday

Casual chic: The writer donned tight light brown trousers with a flair at the end which are strictly against her family's dress code growing up which was enforced by the Institute Of Basic Life Principles

Casual chic: The writer donned tight light brown trousers with a flair at the end which are strictly against her family’s dress code growing up which was enforced by the Institute Of Basic Life Principles

According to the International OCD Foundation, ‘scrupulous individuals are overly concerned that something they thought or did might be a sin or other violation of religious or moral doctrine.’

And Jinger agreed with Mayim’s assessment after she revealed she would wake up the middle of the night afraid that God would ‘smite me dead.’

She explained how during his sermons IBLP founder Bill Gothard would ask parishioners to make ‘vows’ focused around God.

Jinger claimed that followers were told if the vows – which include praying and reading the bible – weren’t met, that ‘God will be out to get you.’ 

Upon hearing this Mayim asked her about ‘where your young mind went with this dogma.’

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Jinger then explained that she ‘had these little fears as a child already’ that only got worse ‘whenever you place on top of that, “God is out to get you.”‘ 

‘I was a very compliant child. I was never one to push the boundaries. I wanted to do what was right,’ she explained.

‘If I was going to bed at night, I’d be terrified in fear thinking, “Have I done what’s right? Did I forget any of the principals?”‘

Her rebellious act comes at an interesting time as back in August she admitted she may had religious obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) as a child after breaking away from her family's ultra-strict religious beliefs

Her rebellious act comes at an interesting time as back in August she admitted she may had religious obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) as a child after breaking away from her family’s ultra-strict religious beliefs 

The Jeopardy host started by saying she didn't want to 'pathologize' Jinger, but went on to explain that 'there is a thing called religious obsessive compulsive disorder'

The Jeopardy host started by saying she didn’t want to ‘pathologize’ Jinger, but went on to explain that ‘there is a thing called religious obsessive compulsive disorder’

She went on to say that Religious OCD that it sounded 'exactly' like what Jinger was describing

Then Mayim went on to list symptoms from the Center for Anxiety Disorders site, which included 'compulsive praying'

Mayim went on to say that religious OCD sounded ‘exactly’ like what Jinger was describing

Jinger agreed with the assessment, explaining, 'I would kind of look at other people outside of our circles and think, "OK, maybe they're walking with God. Maybe they're not"'

Jinger agreed with the assessment, explaining, ‘I would kind of look at other people outside of our circles and think, “OK, maybe they’re walking with God. Maybe they’re not”‘

If she hadn’t, she’d wake up in the middle of the night and read her bible because she ‘made this vow to God’ while in service with Bill. 

‘Otherwise maybe God’s gonna smite me dead,’ she said of her fears. 

‘You start to feel this fear or anxiety within because the teachings produce that,’ she added, and so she worked hard ‘trying to appease God at every turn’ as a child.

What is religious OCD? 

The National Institute of Mental Health has defined OCD as a condition that causes uncontrollable thoughts or behavior that can often lead to repetition, as per Medical News Today.

Religious OCD involves obsessions and compulsions directly related to religion or morality. 

Some obsessions include fear of going to hell or being punished by god, constantly striving for purity and fear of death.

These obsessions can lead to compulsions like excessively praying, repeatedly seeking reassurance from religious leaders and excessive confession of perceived sins.

OCD tends to be develop through genetics and brain structure, but the scrupulous aspect of religious OCD has been linked to environment. Those who have endured childhood drama in extremely religious settings are more likely to develop this type of OCD.

The Jeopardy host stressed she didn’t want to ‘pathologize’ Jinger or give her a diagnosis, but went on to say that ‘there is a thing called religious obsessive compulsive disorder.’ 

Mayim said the disorder was common for people raised in ‘extremely religious communities’ and that it sounded ‘exactly’ like what the reality TV star was describing.

She went on to list symptoms from the Center for Anxiety Disorders site, which included ‘compulsive praying,’ which saw the person ‘restarting the prayer if you start it wrong.’

Other symptoms included ‘reading or studying obsessively and questioning your motives because of God’s role in it, constantly seeking forgiveness or things that you have to do to guarantee safety.’

She added: ‘That’s, like, literally the definition of OCD. 

‘That people have these compulsive behaviors that they believe will guarantee them safety and freedom from the obsessions.

‘It’s kind of interesting because what you describe sounds a lot like your brain latched on to something, you know, and it became this kind of focus for you.’ 

Jinger also reflected: ‘I would kind of look at other people outside of our circles and think, “OK, maybe they’re walking with God. Maybe they’re not.” Because you kind of see differences.

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‘If women wore pants in their family, I was like, “OK, well I know they’re not obeying every rule as they’re supposed to.”‘

She also believed that anyone who strayed from the rules of Bill’s IBLP rules was ‘putting their family’s chance for success at risk.’

One of the principals included fasting and Jinger became so invested that she developed an eating disorder. 

Mayim commented: ‘It seems like you couldn’t escape from God, meaning in ways that didn’t feel loving or supportive.’ 

‘It affected everything,’ Jinger agreed. 

Jinger then explained that she 'had these little fears as a child already' that only got worse 'whenever you place on top of that, "God is out to get you"'

Jinger then explained that she ‘had these little fears as a child already’ that only got worse ‘whenever you place on top of that, “God is out to get you”‘

'I was a very compliant child. I was never one to push the boundaries. I wanted to do what was right,' she told Mayim

‘I was a very compliant child. I was never one to push the boundaries. I wanted to do what was right,’ she told Mayim

Mayim believes that Jinger's 'extremely religious' upbringing in the Duggar household could've lead to her developing religious OCD

Mayim believes that Jinger’s ‘extremely religious’ upbringing in the Duggar household could’ve lead to her developing religious OCD

If she was going to go out shopping or to play with her siblings, she’d be fearful thinking: ‘I could be killed in this car accident because maybe I had this feeling I was supposed to stay home and read my bible for two hours.’

‘There was a lot of fear that I had to work through and it wasn’t until I came out of these teachings that I saw where it stemmed from,’ she shared.

All in all, she claimed to ‘wholeheartedly believe’ Mayim’s informal diagnosis. 

The mom-of-two shared that she wasn’t able to recognize this toxic mentality and break away from it until she met husband Jeremy Vuolo. 

She spoke out about breaking away from IBLP in great detail in her memoir, Becoming Free Indeed. 

‘I noticed his church read the Bible in its entirety and preached scripture that way. I feel like now I’m in a much better place. I see God as amazing,’ she wrote.

‘I was probably one of the most sensitive people in my family, so I was a rule follower.

The mom-of-two shared that she wasn't able to recognize this toxic mentality and breakaway from it until she met her husband, Jeremy Vuolo

The mom-of-two shared that she wasn’t able to recognize this toxic mentality and breakaway from it until she met her husband, Jeremy Vuolo

She spoke out about breaking away from IBLP in great detail in her memoir, Becoming Free Indeed

She spoke out about breaking away from IBLP in great detail in her memoir, Becoming Free Indeed

‘If that was an inch on a skirt, I would be like “Oh, no. I can’t sit down with this skirt on.” Because it would barely show like a quarter of my knee. I was a legalist to the extreme because that’s what Bill Gothard said would protect you,’ she added.

She also laid bare the anxieties that Mayim deemed to be religious OCD because although she had a ‘very happy childhood,’ she was ‘wrestling’ internally with ‘so much fear and a wrong view of God.’

‘I viewed the outside world as kind of like, “I want to reach them. I want to share these principles with the world because this is going to help,”‘ she penned.

‘I had some friends who were walking with Jesus, but they did think differently. They listened to music with drums, the women would wear pants, they wouldn’t have as many kids as possible. 

‘I would look at them and think, “They just don’t know… People can still be Christians outside of this, but they just won’t have success.”‘

‘I would look at the outside world as well and be kind of scared of influences, scared of being around anyone too long who wasn’t exactly like me and my convictions.’

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